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As promised: how Tom Hiddleston made my day.

fahrlight:

bagginbooty:

OK HERE WE GO:

So this morning, I opened this birthday card thinking ooh dayum, look at dat hiddles, mother you have good taste in cards…

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I opened the card, however, and lost all ability to talk.

It wasn’t from my Mum.

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Turns out my mum wrote to him with this blank card and he wrote it for me!

I am so overwhelmed and grateful and oh my crumpets I cannot even…

Thank you, Tom, you wonderful person, you made my day an incredibly special one! 

One lucky girl!

eruditechick:

the1janitor:

setralynn:

knightless:

jellybabiesandjammiedodgers:

Via Amy Schley

In case we needed further proof that Heroes of Cosplay was crap….

This strongly echoes my experience with the “Heroes” staff, though I think the cruelty of their behavior toward you may have something to do with me and Pas.  At Anime Matsuri, the HoC staff didn’t film or interact with anyone but their plants.  The show was delayed for reasons unknown, people with large weapons, uncomfortable costumes, and significant props were kept waiting in a dirty concrete hallway for close to an hour after being pulled from the greenroom.  The show (this may have been a convention decision) was also using a lot of theatrical smoke on stage without annoucement or discussion with competitors.  As I personally knew two people competing with asthma, this was a bit of a problem.

Though we’d all been told to leave our bags in the greenroom, SyFy later took over that room for the judges, so any bags left behind were moved by staff.  There were rumors that SyFy had tried to influence the judges.

When none of their people won, they did take all the winners off to an un-airconditioned hallway to wait for 30-40 minutes and then do an interview.  At one point I heard a producer-type say “we can’t use them because no one knows what they’re from.”  They didn’t bother asking me for any information on what we were from of course, and they did still interview us though none of that footage, or indeed any footage of us on stage or accepting our award was used.  In the interview, when our first response was “There were so many amazing people in this competition and so many people who we really, deeply respect, and it’s an incredible honor that the judges felt like we deserved Best in Show.”… the interviewer’s face dropped.  Had we competed together before?  No not really.  Had we heard of the judges before?  No, not until the panels we went to the day before.  (This is not totally true, since being World Cosplay Summit fans, we did know of and deeply respect Rynn.)

The long story short of this whole bullshit appears to be that SyFy or the HoC production team had no idea what they were getting into when they decided to exploit and manipulate cosplay contests for a reality TV show.  They tossed semi-pro and pro competitors into smaller local contests, and handled it poorly.  All I can hope is that the failure of this show will inspire someone to make a better one.  I’d love a show about the creative process of cosplay, about the love of character and performance that drives us all to pursue this insanely expensive and time-consuming hobby.  Heroes of Cosplay was not that show.

this is how ‘reality’ tv works in pretty much all cases

I was auditioned for the role of token girl on AMC’s Comic Book Men. Two men auditioned me, a camera guy and a producer. I wore capris and my Captain America t-shirt, it was hot out but the trip to Red Hook (which is beautiful) was fun, and I was excited to talk about comics though I had strong reservations about participating in a Reality Show. 

I was asked a variety of questions about how I got into comics, which characters I loved and related to most. At some point I spoke about the fact that growing up I moved every three years due to my dad’s job, and that having a cast of anthology characters that I could return to time and again was a constant and a comfort and something I had valued growing up. The camera man said, “That was a fantastic answer.” 

The producer said, “Would you say comic book characters were like surrogate family members for you?”

I looked at him like he was a little nuts and said no, I didn’t use them to substitute family or friends, but they were important to me and influenced what I valued in people.

They asked me about what I considered myself an expert one, and I said the X-Men and Captain America, then the Avengers, then Marvel in general although there were characters and teams I didn’t know crap about- see also, Alpha Flight, Moon Knight. I said I was well versed in Batman mythology and had always loved Catwoman, but wasn’t much of a DC kid. The producer asked if I frequently found myself in conflict with people over comic book knowledge.

I said not really, that if I knew I was right about something I certainly wouldn’t back down, but I also wasn’t about to be contentious with someone about, say, Green Lantern, about whom I know precisely nothing except his ring is green.

After some prodding, the producer said, and I’m paraphrasing but not much, “But you enjoy kinda of getting into it with guys about comic book knowledge, right? Fighting about comic books?”

I jokingly made the allowance that “Well a good fight can be fun.”

The producer said, “Can you just sum that up into one kind of sound-bite sentence, like: ‘I like fighting’.”

I was quiet for a beat, looking briefly at the camera man who seemed faintly embarrassed, then looked evenly back at the producer and said “I enjoy engaging in spirited debate with friends and fellow fans about comic books, sure.”

That pretty much ended my interview.

Reality tv is scripted. Participants may endeavor to provide an honest portrayal of themselves, they may strive to be genuine, but the producers have absolutely no interest in that. They control everything as much as humanly possible, put words in peoples’ mouths, refilm moments from all angles until they get the scene they want.

Reality television is not real, and it sucks when it drags unwilling participants into the process.

"Dylan and I went to Jeff with an idea for a scene. I don’t want to say what it is because it might still be used, hopefully. Because I do think it would be a really good fun scene and it’s a really great touching scene. NOT TOUCHING! Actually there would be some touching but don’t worry about it."

(Source: httpsterek)

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